How to read it: “the origin of the Corinthian order”

(Saturday) (Sunday)

The history of architecture is full of ‘origin myths’: stories of how and where architecture began. These range from the eighteenth-century idea of the ‘primitive hut’, to nineteenth-century interests in animal skins and fabrics, and modernist conceptions of space. What makes these myths important is the way they describe the point at which architecture becomes culture, when the act of building becomes imbued with cultural meanings that can be read and interpreted.



Origins takes these myths as the starting-point for a series of interventions around Burlington House, intended to pose a new, provocative allegory of the foundations of contemporary architecture. Several of the interventions occupy prominent spaces that are currently empty or in transition owing to the ongoing RA250 project, thus forging an intriguing dialogue with the building’s own history. Other interventions can be found in lesser known or often overlooked parts of the building, inviting viewers to look again at how we understand and experience the spaces we occupy.



Realised through a number of techniques and materials, the interventions are grouped according to particular themes, which together pose a new set of ‘origin myths’ of architecture. Embracing the creative possibilities of erroneous theories, misunderstood histories, personal mythologies and speculative wild goose chases, Origins offers a powerful new perspective on the myths, conventions and histories that guide how architecture is both created and experienced.

Royal Academy of Arts
Burlington House
W1J 0BD London
United kingdom
020 7300 8000
https://www.royalacademy.org.uk/exhibition/origins-ordi...

Tags

Other,

Selection of further exhibitions in: United kingdom

01.02.2019 - 23.11.2019
17.05.2019 - 29.09.2019
Manchester Art Gallery
Mosley Street
Manchester

Read more >>
07.05.2019 - 04.08.2019
The Fitzwilliam Museum
Trumpington Street
Cambridge

Read more >>
22.07.2018 - 05.05.2020
Birmingham Museums & Art Gallery
Chamberlain Square
Birmingham

Read more >>
02.11.2016 - 20.11.2020
UCL Art Museum
Gower Street
London

Read more >>
08.07.2019 - 29.07.2019
Manchester Art Gallery
Mosley Street
Manchester

Read more >>
02.01.2019 - 30.11.2019
The Fitzwilliam Museum
Trumpington Street
Cambridge

Read more >>
26.06.2019 - 29.09.2019
Birmingham Museums & Art Gallery
Chamberlain Square
Birmingham

Read more >>
05.07.2019 - 20.07.2019
Manchester Art Gallery
Mosley Street
Manchester

Read more >>
04.06.2019 - 08.09.2019
The Fitzwilliam Museum
Trumpington Street
Cambridge

Read more >>
21.05.2019 - 01.09.2019
06.05.2019 - 24.02.2020
16.10.2019 - 01.03.2020
Design Museum
28 Shad Thames
London

Read more >>
05.02.2019 - 18.08.2019
The Fitzwilliam Museum
Trumpington Street
Cambridge

Read more >>
10.11.2018 - 31.03.2020
Birmingham Museums & Art Gallery
Chamberlain Square
Birmingham

Read more >>










How to read it: “the origin of the Corinthian order” Royal Academy of Arts Main address: Royal Academy of Arts Burlington House W1J 0BD London, United kingdom Royal Academy of Arts Burlington House W1J 0BD London, United kingdom The history of architecture is full of ‘origin myths’: stories of how and where architecture began. These range from the eighteenth-century idea of the ‘primitive hut’, to nineteenth-century interests in animal skins and fabrics, and modernist conceptions of space. What makes these myths important is the way they describe the point at which architecture becomes culture, when the act of building becomes imbued with cultural meanings that can be read and interpreted.



Origins takes these myths as the starting-point for a series of interventions around Burlington House, intended to pose a new, provocative allegory of the foundations of contemporary architecture. Several of the interventions occupy prominent spaces that are currently empty or in transition owing to the ongoing RA250 project, thus forging an intriguing dialogue with the building’s own history. Other interventions can be found in lesser known or often overlooked parts of the building, inviting viewers to look again at how we understand and experience the spaces we occupy.



Realised through a number of techniques and materials, the interventions are grouped according to particular themes, which together pose a new set of ‘origin myths’ of architecture. Embracing the creative possibilities of erroneous theories, misunderstood histories, personal mythologies and speculative wild goose chases, Origins offers a powerful new perspective on the myths, conventions and histories that guide how architecture is both created and experienced.
Book tickets