So Hot Right Now

(Thursday) (Saturday)

School of Visual Arts presents “So Hot Right Now,” an exhibition of work by MFA Fine Arts students selected by a jury of their peers. Organized by SVA Galleries, “So Hot Right Now” is on view Thursday, July 9, through Saturday, August 8, at the SVA Chelsea Gallery, 601 West 26th Street, 15th floor, New York City.School of Visual Arts presents “So Hot Right Now,” an exhibition of work by MFA Fine Arts students selected by a jury of their peers. Organized by SVA Galleries, “So Hot Right Now” is on view Thursday, July 9, through Saturday, August 8, at the SVA Chelsea Gallery, 601 West 26th Street, 15th floor, New York City.The works in “So Hot Right Now” respond to historian Eric Hobsbawm’s question, posed in the collection of essays The Invention of Tradition, of “how far new traditions can use old materials, how far they may be forced to invent new languages and devices, or extend the old symbolic vocabulary beyond its established limits.” Featured works cross mediums to explore how rituals both banal and sacred can form individual identities through repetition and reverie.Participating artists include Eli Barak, Sean Donovan, Delano Dunn, Ron Erlih, HHU, Scarlett Lingwood, Susan Luss, Amalia Mourad, Jonathan Schouela and Ali Shrago-Spechler.Eli Barak’s “Power Drawings” are created with power tools liberating drawing from the tyranny of the artist’s hand.Sean Donovan’s multimedia work, The Conversation utilizes a(?) mirror and monitor to explore the symbiotic relationship between painting and viewer.Delano Dunn’s drawings regard the multiplicity of the black experience using imagery from Richard Scarry's Best Word Book Ever. His work explores poverty, welfare checks, food stamps and the ritual aspect of waiting for the first of the month to get a government check.Ron Erlih’s multimedia project "A Campaign - working title" - Celebrating the Weird includes clips from studio visits he has experienced, as well as a QR code and invitation to participate in online activity both in and outside of the gallery.HHU explores the process of cleaning in both public and private spaces through performance and sculpture, focusing on the idea that dirt never really disappears, but is only transferred form one material to another.Scarlett Lingwood presents tracings of past works made with newspaper and magazines, exploring repetitive process and the utilization of found materials.Susan Luss’ Vefa is a weaving that came out of her desire to experience a larger connection to the world through simple established actions, like walking down the street, having a conversation with a stranger along the way, stopping to listen to a red bird sing a mating song, or any of the myriad of layered sights and sounds that occur daily.Amalia Mourad’s Aaron and Guy invents a new first man, this time named Aaron instead of Adam, who exists post apocalypse, in the “third cycle of the world.” According to Mourad, “He will have a beard and a polka-dot bathing suit. He will live in a cave called ‘Kaja’s Cave,’ which will protect him from the elements. And he will have two best friends: a plant pillow and dead dog. One day Aaron will meet Guy, who also likes to wear a polka-dot bikini, and they will fall in love for a little bit. Guy carries around a giant monkey wrench almost everywhere he goes. It makes him feel secure and powerful. His interests include monkeys, ice cream and day dreaming. One night, Guy will find a bottle. ‘Don’t drink from the bottle!’ yells out Aaron. But Guy will not listen and he will drink, and drink, and drink. . . . And soon Guy and Aaron will be stuck in the ghost world.”Jonathan Schouela’s “The Other Side of the World,” is a group of drawings of dragon paintings appropriated from online fantasy-art communities, presented in chromed ready-made picture frames sitting on top of an acrylic end table and counter. They are drawings of paintings, presented as photographs in an assemblage sculpture.Ali Shrago-Spechler’s installation A Whole New Megillah investigates repetition and ritual utilizing her own family narrative, the Jewish holiday of Purim and her own invented history.Juried exhibitions are a way for SVA’s student body to recognize the achievements of their classmates. Artists are selected from a large pool of applicants through a rigorous examination of presented materials, including documentation of work and artist statements.

School of Visual Arts - SVA
209 East 23 Street
l 800.436. New York
United states
800.436.4204
http://www.sva.edu/events/events-exhibitions/so-hot-rig...

Selection of further exhibitions in: United states

18.10.2019 - 09.02.2020
The Jewish Museum
1109 Fifth Avenue at 92nd Street
New York

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01.11.2019 - 22.03.2020
The Jewish Museum
1109 Fifth Avenue at 92nd Street
New York

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15.12.2018 - 30.06.2020
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
465 Huntington Avenue
Boston

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18.10.2019 - 09.02.2020
Perez Art Museum Miami - PAMM
1103 Biscayne Blvd.
Miami

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18.07.2019 - 07.06.2020
Perez Art Museum Miami - PAMM
1103 Biscayne Blvd.
Miami

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31.08.2019 - 05.07.2020
de Young Museum | de Young
50 Hagiwara Tea Garden Drive
San Francisco

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01.07.2019 - 23.02.2020
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
465 Huntington Avenue
Boston

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05.10.2019 - 23.02.2020
Legion of Honor | Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco
100 34th Avenue
San Francisco

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13.10.2019 - 20.01.2020
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
465 Huntington Avenue
Boston

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27.02.2020 - 30.05.2021
Perez Art Museum Miami - PAMM
1103 Biscayne Blvd.
Miami

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21.03.2020 - 06.09.2020
Legion of Honor | Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco
100 34th Avenue
San Francisco

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24.07.2019 - 20.07.2020
01.11.2019 - 01.11.2020
Seattle Art Museum
1300 FIRST AVENUE
Seattle

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22.11.2019 - 06.07.2020
Perez Art Museum Miami - PAMM
1103 Biscayne Blvd.
Miami

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20.07.2019 - 20.01.2020
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
465 Huntington Avenue
Boston

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01.08.2019 - 03.03.2020
20.01.2020 - 20.01.2020
Mexican and Latino Art Museum | San Francisco | In Association With The Smithsonian Institution - Th
Fort Mason Center, 2 Marina Blvd., Building D
San Francisco

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11.07.2020 - 07.02.2021
Seattle Art Museum
1300 FIRST AVENUE
Seattle

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So Hot Right Now School of Visual Arts - SVA Main address: School of Visual Arts - SVA 209 East 23 Street l 800.436. New York, United states School of Visual Arts - SVA 209 East 23 Street l 800.436. New York, United states School of Visual Arts presents “So Hot Right Now,” an exhibition of work by MFA Fine Arts students selected by a jury of their peers. Organized by SVA Galleries, “So Hot Right Now” is on view Thursday, July 9, through Saturday, August 8, at the SVA Chelsea Gallery, 601 West 26th Street, 15th floor, New York City.School of Visual Arts presents “So Hot Right Now,” an exhibition of work by MFA Fine Arts students selected by a jury of their peers. Organized by SVA Galleries, “So Hot Right Now” is on view Thursday, July 9, through Saturday, August 8, at the SVA Chelsea Gallery, 601 West 26th Street, 15th floor, New York City.The works in “So Hot Right Now” respond to historian Eric Hobsbawm’s question, posed in the collection of essays The Invention of Tradition, of “how far new traditions can use old materials, how far they may be forced to invent new languages and devices, or extend the old symbolic vocabulary beyond its established limits.” Featured works cross mediums to explore how rituals both banal and sacred can form individual identities through repetition and reverie.Participating artists include Eli Barak, Sean Donovan, Delano Dunn, Ron Erlih, HHU, Scarlett Lingwood, Susan Luss, Amalia Mourad, Jonathan Schouela and Ali Shrago-Spechler.Eli Barak’s “Power Drawings” are created with power tools liberating drawing from the tyranny of the artist’s hand.Sean Donovan’s multimedia work, The Conversation utilizes a(?) mirror and monitor to explore the symbiotic relationship between painting and viewer.Delano Dunn’s drawings regard the multiplicity of the black experience using imagery from Richard Scarry's Best Word Book Ever. His work explores poverty, welfare checks, food stamps and the ritual aspect of waiting for the first of the month to get a government check.Ron Erlih’s multimedia project "A Campaign - working title" - Celebrating the Weird includes clips from studio visits he has experienced, as well as a QR code and invitation to participate in online activity both in and outside of the gallery.HHU explores the process of cleaning in both public and private spaces through performance and sculpture, focusing on the idea that dirt never really disappears, but is only transferred form one material to another.Scarlett Lingwood presents tracings of past works made with newspaper and magazines, exploring repetitive process and the utilization of found materials.Susan Luss’ Vefa is a weaving that came out of her desire to experience a larger connection to the world through simple established actions, like walking down the street, having a conversation with a stranger along the way, stopping to listen to a red bird sing a mating song, or any of the myriad of layered sights and sounds that occur daily.Amalia Mourad’s Aaron and Guy invents a new first man, this time named Aaron instead of Adam, who exists post apocalypse, in the “third cycle of the world.” According to Mourad, “He will have a beard and a polka-dot bathing suit. He will live in a cave called ‘Kaja’s Cave,’ which will protect him from the elements. And he will have two best friends: a plant pillow and dead dog. One day Aaron will meet Guy, who also likes to wear a polka-dot bikini, and they will fall in love for a little bit. Guy carries around a giant monkey wrench almost everywhere he goes. It makes him feel secure and powerful. His interests include monkeys, ice cream and day dreaming. One night, Guy will find a bottle. ‘Don’t drink from the bottle!’ yells out Aaron. But Guy will not listen and he will drink, and drink, and drink. . . . And soon Guy and Aaron will be stuck in the ghost world.”Jonathan Schouela’s “The Other Side of the World,” is a group of drawings of dragon paintings appropriated from online fantasy-art communities, presented in chromed ready-made picture frames sitting on top of an acrylic end table and counter. They are drawings of paintings, presented as photographs in an assemblage sculpture.Ali Shrago-Spechler’s installation A Whole New Megillah investigates repetition and ritual utilizing her own family narrative, the Jewish holiday of Purim and her own invented history.Juried exhibitions are a way for SVA’s student body to recognize the achievements of their classmates. Artists are selected from a large pool of applicants through a rigorous examination of presented materials, including documentation of work and artist statements. Book tickets