Inbox: Whitfield Lovell

(Saturday) (Sunday)

Exhibition. March 25–April 30, 2017. While much of Whitfield Lovell’s work is based on anonymous photographs, Pop/Pistol is a uniquely personal drawing for the artist. It depicts his grandfather, Eugene Glover, who was shot and killed by muggers while returning home from the bank in 1984. “Every target, every bull’s-eye, every gun and knife holds a personal resonance for me,” Lovell has said, “although I am rarely thinking of or reliving those losses, but rather using these [objects] as symbols for the losses of everyone, the violence we perpetrate upon our fellow human beings, be it physical or verbal, political or psychological.” Set against a vibrant orange field, the profile image of Glover (“Pop”) and the detailed rendering of a gun are surrounded by a text describing the crime that was published in the New York Daily News. By transcribing the impersonal facts of the news story in his own looping script, Lovell reclaims the publicly reported event as an instance of private grief.

MoMA - Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53 Street
NY 10019-5 New York
United states
(212) 708-9400
http://www.moma.org/calendar/exhibitions/3829?locale=en

Selection of further exhibitions in: United states

07.04.2017 - 20.08.2017
Smithsonian American Art Museum
8th and G Sts NW
Washington

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09.04.2017 - 10.09.2017
MoMA - Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53 Street
New York

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01.07.2017 - 11.02.2018
Smithsonian American Art Museum
8th and G Sts NW
Washington

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26.05.2017 - 04.09.2017
Smithsonian American Art Museum
8th and G Sts NW
Washington

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31.10.2017 - 01.04.2018
MoMA - Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53 Street
New York

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27.05.2017 - 16.07.2017
MoMA - Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53 Street
New York

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29.10.2016 - 07.05.2017
MoMA - Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53 Street
New York

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21.05.2016 - 17.09.2017
MoMA - Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53 Street
New York

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15.03.2019 - 14.07.2019
Smithsonian American Art Museum
8th and G Sts NW
Washington

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12.05.2017 - 06.08.2017
Smithsonian American Art Museum
8th and G Sts NW
Washington

Read more >>
12.05.2017 - 06.08.2017
Smithsonian American Art Museum
8th and G Sts NW
Washington

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10.03.2017 - 27.08.2017
Smithsonian American Art Museum
8th and G Sts NW
Washington

Read more >>
09.04.2017 - 10.09.2017
MoMA - Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53 Street
New York

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17.03.2016 - 06.08.2017
The Jewish Museum
1109 Fifth Avenue at 92nd Street
New York

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17.03.2016 - 06.08.2017
The Jewish Museum
1109 Fifth Avenue at 92nd Street
New York

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12.06.2017 - 01.10.2017
MoMA - Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53 Street
New York

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09.04.2017 - 25.09.2017
MoMA - Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53 Street
New York

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24.09.2017 - 01.01.2018
MoMA - Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53 Street
New York

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Inbox: Whitfield Lovell MoMA - Museum of Modern Art Main address: MoMA - Museum of Modern Art 11 West 53 Street NY 10019-5 New York, United states MoMA - Museum of Modern Art 11 West 53 Street NY 10019-5 New York, United states Exhibition. March 25–April 30, 2017. While much of Whitfield Lovell’s work is based on anonymous photographs, Pop/Pistol is a uniquely personal drawing for the artist. It depicts his grandfather, Eugene Glover, who was shot and killed by muggers while returning home from the bank in 1984. “Every target, every bull’s-eye, every gun and knife holds a personal resonance for me,” Lovell has said, “although I am rarely thinking of or reliving those losses, but rather using these [objects] as symbols for the losses of everyone, the violence we perpetrate upon our fellow human beings, be it physical or verbal, political or psychological.” Set against a vibrant orange field, the profile image of Glover (“Pop”) and the detailed rendering of a gun are surrounded by a text describing the crime that was published in the New York Daily News. By transcribing the impersonal facts of the news story in his own looping script, Lovell reclaims the publicly reported event as an instance of private grief. Book tickets