Past Is Present: Revival Jewelry

(Tuesday) (Sunday)

Whether copying or choosing motifs to reinterpret, jewelers have always looked to the past for inspiration. The practice became popular in the 19th century, as designers like Castellani, Giacinto Melillo and Eugene Fontenay began reviving examples of ancient ornaments, newly unearthed in archaeological excavations. Examine more than 4,000 years of jewelry history through about 70 objects—both ancient and revival—tracing the revival movement from the 19th to the 21st centuries. The exhibition focuses on four types—archaeological, Classical, Egyptian, and Renaissance. Highlights include an 1850s embellished gold brooch by Castellani; a Renaissance revival neck ornament (1900–04) designed for Tiffany & Co.; a 1980s Bulgari necklace adorned with Macedonian coins; and a 2002 Akelo pendant that emulates an ancient Etruscan granulation technique.

Above: Designed by G. Paulding Farnham for Tiffany & Co., Renaissance revival neck ornament, 1900–04. Platinum, gold, enamel, diamond, ruby, emerald, cat’s eye, chrysoberyl, sapphire, and pearl. Gift of Susan B. Kaplan.

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
465 Huntington Avenue
MA 02115 Boston
United states
617-267-9300
http://www.mfa.org/exhibitions/past-is-present-revival-...

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Design,

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New York

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New York

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New York

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8th and G Sts NW
Washington

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Cambridge

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Past Is Present: Revival Jewelry Museum of Fine Arts, Boston Main address: Museum of Fine Arts, Boston 465 Huntington Avenue MA 02115 Boston, United states Museum of Fine Arts, Boston 465 Huntington Avenue MA 02115 Boston, United states Whether copying or choosing motifs to reinterpret, jewelers have always looked to the past for inspiration. The practice became popular in the 19th century, as designers like Castellani, Giacinto Melillo and Eugene Fontenay began reviving examples of ancient ornaments, newly unearthed in archaeological excavations. Examine more than 4,000 years of jewelry history through about 70 objects—both ancient and revival—tracing the revival movement from the 19th to the 21st centuries. The exhibition focuses on four types—archaeological, Classical, Egyptian, and Renaissance. Highlights include an 1850s embellished gold brooch by Castellani; a Renaissance revival neck ornament (1900–04) designed for Tiffany & Co.; a 1980s Bulgari necklace adorned with Macedonian coins; and a 2002 Akelo pendant that emulates an ancient Etruscan granulation technique.

Above: Designed by G. Paulding Farnham for Tiffany & Co., Renaissance revival neck ornament, 1900–04. Platinum, gold, enamel, diamond, ruby, emerald, cat’s eye, chrysoberyl, sapphire, and pearl. Gift of Susan B. Kaplan.
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