Hey! You! Get Off of My Cloud, Part 1

(Thursday) (Wednesday)

MA Curatorial Practice presents "Hey! You! Get off of My Cloud, Part 1," an exhibition curated by program fellow Michele Thursz. "Hey! You! Get off of My Cloud, Part 1" is the first in a series of exhibitions that explores the impact of cloud computing on culture, economy and artistic practice.The title of the exhibition refers to the 1965 song by the Rolling Stones, and more broadly to the social and generational upheaval generated by rock-and-roll in the late 1950 – 60s, which precipitated the exploration of new cultural expressions and the creation of a new cultural economy. Today, many visual artists refer to the production model of the music industry, regarding collaboration, creation and alternatives to the commercial distribution model. The works in this exhibition use cloud computing for the analysis of data and the flows of social media and emails—each addressing ideas related to perception, authorship, memory, choice, chance and values.The cloud and the internet are information components that comprise their own ecosystem. Commercially, information systems are being used to achieve competitive advantage, effectively achieving a business objective. The utilization and protocols of the system are quickly becoming a global standard, forcing all markets to subscribe to similar standards. There are pro and cons to this strategy, due to the electronic platforms for information that efficiently create uniformity and consequently eliminate the utopian quality of the internet as a fully equitable, democratic information space. Yet at the same time, the same system is used to support information distribution for educational purposes, while creatively, artists are making use of cloud storage, which harbors software for the digital studio, as well as the content it produces. The cloud is therefore many things simultaneously, offering planetary computation in every aspect of human endeavor, both for industrial culture and individual autonomy. S/ N Coalition’s The Fawn (2017) utilizes a free mobile application to explore character and contemporary issues and the relationship between physical and virtual space through a playful perspective of childhood. Yucef Merhi’s Interior Security (2016) employs the act of hacking as an instrument for art production, endorsing email as an open and uncensored source of contemporary knowledge. Freya Powell’s Omniscience and Oblivion (2016) presents seemingly everyday memories that point to the potential existence of collective memory. And Seibren Versteeg presents Fake News (2016), a real-time program created by one-per-minute compositions that algorithmically incorporate images from various news aggregators.In all of this, "Hey! You! Get off of My Cloud, Part 1" emphasizes some of the fascinating ways that artists are using cloud computing to support empowerment, individuality and a social commentary. As with many instances in history, the invention of new technologies brings to light evolving dialogues about social issues and the effects of industry. Today, the individual, the artist, corporate entities and governments are using the same mechanisms. Whether right or wrong, we as a global society are becoming one. The question is: In the cloud, do we share and share alike?MA Curatorial Practice presents "Hey! You! Get off of My Cloud, Part 1," an exhibition curated by program fellow Michele Thursz. "Hey! You! Get off of My Cloud, Part 1" is the first in a series of exhibitions that explores the impact of cloud computing on culture, economy and artistic practice.The title of the exhibition refers to the 1965 song by the Rolling Stones, and more broadly to the social and generational upheaval generated by rock-and-roll in the late 1950 – 60s, which precipitated the exploration of new cultural expressions and the creation of a new cultural economy. Today, many visual artists refer to the production model of the music industry, regarding collaboration, creation and alternatives to the commercial distribution model. The works in this exhibition use cloud computing for the analysis of data and the flows of social media and emails—each addressing ideas related to perception, authorship, memory, choice, chance and values.The cloud and the internet are information components that comprise their own ecosystem. Commercially, information systems are being used to achieve competitive advantage, effectively achieving a business objective. The utilization and protocols of the system are quickly becoming a global standard, forcing all markets to subscribe to similar standards. There are pro and cons to this strategy, due to the electronic platforms for information that efficiently create uniformity and consequently eliminate the utopian quality of the internet as a fully equitable, democratic information space. Yet at the same time, the same system is used to support information distribution for educational purposes, while creatively, artists are making use of cloud storage, which harbors software for the digital studio, as well as the content it produces. The cloud is therefore many things simultaneously, offering planetary computation in every aspect of human endeavor, both for industrial culture and individual autonomy. S/ N Coalition’s The Fawn (2017) utilizes a free mobile application to explore character and contemporary issues and the relationship between physical and virtual space through a playful perspective of childhood. Yucef Merhi’s Interior Security (2016) employs the act of hacking as an instrument for art production, endorsing email as an open and uncensored source of contemporary knowledge. Freya Powell’s Omniscience and Oblivion (2016) presents seemingly everyday memories that point to the potential existence of collective memory. And Seibren Versteeg presents Fake News (2016), a real-time program created by one-per-minute compositions that algorithmically incorporate images from various news aggregators.In all of this, "Hey! You! Get off of My Cloud, Part 1" emphasizes some of the fascinating ways that artists are using cloud computing to support empowerment, individuality and a social commentary. As with many instances in history, the invention of new technologies brings to light evolving dialogues about social issues and the effects of industry. Today, the individual, the artist, corporate entities and governments are using the same mechanisms. Whether right or wrong, we as a global society are becoming one. The question is: In the cloud, do we share and share alike? 

School of Visual Arts - SVA
209 East 23 Street
l 800.436. New York
United states
800.436.4204
http://www.sva.edu/events/events-exhibitions/hey-you-ge...

Selection of further exhibitions in: United states

04.02.2016 - 13.05.2018
National Gallery of Art
4th and Constitution Avenue NW
Washington DC

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28.09.2018 - 17.03.2019
Smithsonian American Art Museum
8th and G Sts NW
Washington

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03.11.2017 - 18.03.2018
The Jewish Museum
1109 Fifth Avenue at 92nd Street
New York

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31.10.2017 - 01.04.2018
MoMA - Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53 Street
New York

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01.11.2017 - 28.01.2018
11.03.2017 - 18.03.2018
Smithsonian American Art Museum
8th and G Sts NW
Washington

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03.11.2017 - 18.03.2018
22.10.2017 - 11.03.2018
MoMA - Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53 Street
New York

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20.10.2017 - 28.01.2018
11.11.2017 - 04.11.2018
MoMA - Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53 Street
New York

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22.10.2017 - 01.02.2018
MoMA - Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53 Street
New York

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26.05.2017 - 21.10.2018
MoMA - Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53 Street
New York

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18.03.2017 - 19.08.2018
MoMA - Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53 Street
New York

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15.06.2018 - 06.01.2019
Smithsonian American Art Museum
8th and G Sts NW
Washington

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16.03.2018 - 05.08.2018
Smithsonian American Art Museum
8th and G Sts NW
Washington

Read more >>
16.03.2018 - 05.08.2018
Smithsonian American Art Museum
8th and G Sts NW
Washington

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22.10.2017 - 31.12.2017
MoMA - Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53 Street
New York

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19.11.2017 - 28.05.2018
MoMA - Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53 Street
New York

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Hey! You! Get Off of My Cloud, Part 1 School of Visual Arts - SVA Main address: School of Visual Arts - SVA 209 East 23 Street l 800.436. New York, United states School of Visual Arts - SVA 209 East 23 Street l 800.436. New York, United states MA Curatorial Practice presents "Hey! You! Get off of My Cloud, Part 1," an exhibition curated by program fellow Michele Thursz. "Hey! You! Get off of My Cloud, Part 1" is the first in a series of exhibitions that explores the impact of cloud computing on culture, economy and artistic practice.The title of the exhibition refers to the 1965 song by the Rolling Stones, and more broadly to the social and generational upheaval generated by rock-and-roll in the late 1950 – 60s, which precipitated the exploration of new cultural expressions and the creation of a new cultural economy. Today, many visual artists refer to the production model of the music industry, regarding collaboration, creation and alternatives to the commercial distribution model. The works in this exhibition use cloud computing for the analysis of data and the flows of social media and emails—each addressing ideas related to perception, authorship, memory, choice, chance and values.The cloud and the internet are information components that comprise their own ecosystem. Commercially, information systems are being used to achieve competitive advantage, effectively achieving a business objective. The utilization and protocols of the system are quickly becoming a global standard, forcing all markets to subscribe to similar standards. There are pro and cons to this strategy, due to the electronic platforms for information that efficiently create uniformity and consequently eliminate the utopian quality of the internet as a fully equitable, democratic information space. Yet at the same time, the same system is used to support information distribution for educational purposes, while creatively, artists are making use of cloud storage, which harbors software for the digital studio, as well as the content it produces. The cloud is therefore many things simultaneously, offering planetary computation in every aspect of human endeavor, both for industrial culture and individual autonomy. S/ N Coalition’s The Fawn (2017) utilizes a free mobile application to explore character and contemporary issues and the relationship between physical and virtual space through a playful perspective of childhood. Yucef Merhi’s Interior Security (2016) employs the act of hacking as an instrument for art production, endorsing email as an open and uncensored source of contemporary knowledge. Freya Powell’s Omniscience and Oblivion (2016) presents seemingly everyday memories that point to the potential existence of collective memory. And Seibren Versteeg presents Fake News (2016), a real-time program created by one-per-minute compositions that algorithmically incorporate images from various news aggregators.In all of this, "Hey! You! Get off of My Cloud, Part 1" emphasizes some of the fascinating ways that artists are using cloud computing to support empowerment, individuality and a social commentary. As with many instances in history, the invention of new technologies brings to light evolving dialogues about social issues and the effects of industry. Today, the individual, the artist, corporate entities and governments are using the same mechanisms. Whether right or wrong, we as a global society are becoming one. The question is: In the cloud, do we share and share alike?MA Curatorial Practice presents "Hey! You! Get off of My Cloud, Part 1," an exhibition curated by program fellow Michele Thursz. "Hey! You! Get off of My Cloud, Part 1" is the first in a series of exhibitions that explores the impact of cloud computing on culture, economy and artistic practice.The title of the exhibition refers to the 1965 song by the Rolling Stones, and more broadly to the social and generational upheaval generated by rock-and-roll in the late 1950 – 60s, which precipitated the exploration of new cultural expressions and the creation of a new cultural economy. Today, many visual artists refer to the production model of the music industry, regarding collaboration, creation and alternatives to the commercial distribution model. The works in this exhibition use cloud computing for the analysis of data and the flows of social media and emails—each addressing ideas related to perception, authorship, memory, choice, chance and values.The cloud and the internet are information components that comprise their own ecosystem. Commercially, information systems are being used to achieve competitive advantage, effectively achieving a business objective. The utilization and protocols of the system are quickly becoming a global standard, forcing all markets to subscribe to similar standards. There are pro and cons to this strategy, due to the electronic platforms for information that efficiently create uniformity and consequently eliminate the utopian quality of the internet as a fully equitable, democratic information space. Yet at the same time, the same system is used to support information distribution for educational purposes, while creatively, artists are making use of cloud storage, which harbors software for the digital studio, as well as the content it produces. The cloud is therefore many things simultaneously, offering planetary computation in every aspect of human endeavor, both for industrial culture and individual autonomy. S/ N Coalition’s The Fawn (2017) utilizes a free mobile application to explore character and contemporary issues and the relationship between physical and virtual space through a playful perspective of childhood. Yucef Merhi’s Interior Security (2016) employs the act of hacking as an instrument for art production, endorsing email as an open and uncensored source of contemporary knowledge. Freya Powell’s Omniscience and Oblivion (2016) presents seemingly everyday memories that point to the potential existence of collective memory. And Seibren Versteeg presents Fake News (2016), a real-time program created by one-per-minute compositions that algorithmically incorporate images from various news aggregators.In all of this, "Hey! You! Get off of My Cloud, Part 1" emphasizes some of the fascinating ways that artists are using cloud computing to support empowerment, individuality and a social commentary. As with many instances in history, the invention of new technologies brings to light evolving dialogues about social issues and the effects of industry. Today, the individual, the artist, corporate entities and governments are using the same mechanisms. Whether right or wrong, we as a global society are becoming one. The question is: In the cloud, do we share and share alike?  Book tickets